Perspective for 2015

Happy New Year Co-op members!  It’s been a couple months since my last entry, which is mostly due to the hectic nature of the Thanksgiving and Christmas season and some year end travel. After a year of hard work and goals achieved, my family and I took the final weeks of 2014 to spend some much-needed quality time together and to focus on the most important things in life, which for us amounts to God and each other. It’s important to recharge and refocus every now and again, and after being able to do so, I feel ready to chase new goals in 2015.

In my mind, the best place to start goal setting is in reflection on recent experiences. Here are my takeaways from 2014 for better Board service this year:

  1. Welcome criticism – of all kinds.

One thing that is hard for everyone to stomach is criticism. It’s hard to hear that your performance does not measure up to people’s expectations. Especially for those amongst us that fit the “over-achiever” mold, getting anything less than an “A” stings.  I had the good fortune of growing up with a hyper-critical father.  At the time, I didn’t consider myself fortunate when I would ask him to read a paper I had spent days perfecting only to have it returned to me riddled with red ink and entire paragraphs crossed out. Eventually I picked up on what he wanted to teach me, which was how to be comfortable with criticism, and once I saw how his relentless corrections and suggestions affected my final product, I realized I should be grateful rather than annoyed. As my dad demonstrated to me when my papers went from B quality to A quality, it is really hard to deliver elite performances without the natural refinement that comes from responding productively to criticism. We should not be afraid to hear from the naysayers, as they provide us with the best opportunity to be better at what we do.

For PEC, that means that we should welcome the remarks of our biggest critics. Even if I, as a Board Member, do not agree with every critique we receive, I appreciate the perspective of someone who sees a particular issue differently than I do. PEC has a handful of members that let us know regularly things we could be doing better. Thank goodness for that! I hope they keep up their comments, however harsh they might be. We had a member recently send us a letter about transparency and openness at the Co-op, entitled Proposal for a True Open Records Policy at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, Inc., which we will be discussing at our Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday.   Detailed, thought-provoking critiques like that of this letter that force us to look at things we are doing or not doing with a new set of eyes.

  1. Be responsible for your own education.

My first six months as a Director for Pedernales Electric provided me with several learning moments and exposed me to the intricacies of the electric utility world, specifically electric co-ops. The energy landscape is constantly changing, and while it may be impossible to stay ahead of the curve, there is a lot that I can do as a Board Member to be more knowledgable and perform better in the Board Room. Most of the education I’ve gotten has come from me being proactive in seeking it out – whether it is asking PEC management and staff questions; talking to other professionals in different sectors of the utility world; reading endless articles people send me; checking energy news feeds daily; and listening to those from the PEC membership that happen to know a lot about our industry, I’ve spent countless hours listening and absorbing so that I can make informed decisions. This educational activity, while time consuming, is very important to do, and I’ll keep putting in the hours because the decisions we make on the PEC Board affect you, the member, in significant ways.  I want to be in the best shape possible to make those decisions.

As a side bar, I’d like to report on another educational opportunity I had recently. In December I traveled to Nashville for a week to complete my Bylaws-required NRECA Credentialed Cooperative Director classes. As it currently states in the PEC Bylaws, a new Board Member must complete all five of these courses before the end of his or her first year on the Board. Since Spring 2015 is going to be very busy for me and my family, I decided the safest bet for me was to knock out all five courses at once at the NRECA Winter School. I have to admit that I was skeptical upon embarking on my trip to Nashville that this week away from my family right before Christmas would be worth my time. I will say, however, that while much of the information was a repeat of things I’d already learned through my own initiative, a few of the classes turned out to be very educational.  (One particular instructor gave me some great insight into power supply – I hope I have the chance to interact with him again.)  I don’t think it’s necessary to take these courses frequently, but depending on the course and the instructor, NRECA educational opportunities can be beneficial. I’ve had several members question me directly about the costs surrounding Director education, and some have asked me specifically to tell them how much my trips would cost. On this trip to Nashville, I made a point of living as frugally as possible. I opted to use the per diem for meals and incidentals as opposed to reimbursing all meal receipts. I didn’t rent a car, and I only took a cab twice to get meals outside of the hotel, as it was incredibly expensive to eat at the Gaylord Opryland, which is where the conference occurred. Even with my efforts to keep costs down, I’ll be reimbursed over $2,000 for my trip, which doesn’t include my airfare or the cost of the classes themselves.

All things considered, I benefited from the education I received in Nashville. However, I believe the focus on education can be local and still provide us with the knowledge we need to do our jobs. There is a lot we can learn from experts here, and perhaps we need to look into ways we can bring educators from NRECA to us in order to avoid expensive travel costs.

  1. You can’t please everybody.

PEC currently has over 250,000 member-owners, and each of them has his or her own ideas about how the Co-op should operate. While it is vitally important to remain in tune with what the membership wants and the specific issues that are brought forward, I must also remember that you all elected me to do a job on your behalf. My job is to uphold the Co-op’s Bylaws and perform my fiduciary duties to ensure PEC is grounded in sound business principles and delivering, safe, reliable, and affordable electricity to you every day. I know there are people that disagree with my perspective and the decisions I make in the Board Room. That reality will continue.  As Directors we are called upon to make some hard choices, and as a result, people get upset regardless of the positions we take. It’s no secret that I lean hard towards fiscal conservatism, and because I believe low cost electricity benefits us all, especially the most vulnerable amongst us, you can expect me to continue to make decisions with that leading principle in mind.  Regardless of who that attitude might upset.

 Looking ahead to 2015…

There are a lot of important things coming up in 2015 of which PEC members should take note. We will shortly have the results of our Integrated Resource Plan, which will give us a better picture of our power supply options in the near future. We will complete a Cost of Service and Rate Design Study, which will include member-input opportunities. Be sure to check out the PEC Website for more information, and I’ll post information here and on my Facebook page as well. The debate over our potential Renewable Energy investments also looms on the horizon. I ask that you stay informed and ask questions if you have them.  Your input is as important now as it’s ever been.

As always, it is an honor to serve the PEC membership.

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